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Josephine (Grabowski) Sowulewski (#27 of 40) – My First 40 Finds in the 1940 US Census
Jun 27th, 2012 by Jessica

Welcome to My First 40 Finds in the 1940 US Census!  This blog series is a tribute to the first 40 entries that I located without the use of an index.

The 1940 US Federal Census was released online to the public on April 2, 2012.  Within the first three days, I had already found 40 families from my various tree branches.  I spent six months prior to the release researching the exact addresses and locations for these families so I could find them quickly upon the census release.

This 1940 US Federal Census entry features the family of Josephine (Grabowski) Sowulewski and her husband Joseph R SowulewskiThis entry is further down on the same page as Josephine’s uncle and aunt Andrew S. Dreffs & Stella Marie (Kryska) Dreffs.  We explored Andrew and Stella’s entries yesterday.

Joseph was 36 and employed as a carpenter at a lumber yard.  Josephine was also 36 and was a housewife.  Their children were Dorothy Sowulewski (15), Arlene Sowulewski (13) and Joseph Sowulewski (10). They owned the home at 2409 Robinwood which was valued at $3,200.

In their household also lived Josephine’s brother Thomas Grabowski. Thomas, age 37, was employed as a core maker in a foundry.

Josephine and Thomas were the children of Hattie (Dreffs) Grabowski, the sister of Andrew S. Dreffs and Walter Anthony Dreffs.

Josephine (Grabowski) Sowulewski
Josephine (Grabowski) Sowulewski

Source citation: 1940 US Federal Census, State of Michigan, Saginaw County, Saginaw, ED 73-47A, Sheet 11A, Lines 33-38.

Find out more about Joseph Sowulewski in my Cole Green Family Tree on Ancestry.com.

Check out the memorial for Joseph Sowulewski on FindAGrave.com.

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Wordless Wednesday – Synchronized Napping
Jun 27th, 2012 by Jessica

Synchronized Napping - Cheetoe & Lucky (April 28, 2012)

Synchronized Napping - Cheetoe & Lucky (April 28, 2012)

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Andrew S. Dreffs (#26 of 40) – My First 40 Finds in the 1940 US Census
Jun 26th, 2012 by Jessica

Welcome to My First 40 Finds in the 1940 US Census!  This blog series is a tribute to the first 40 entries that I located without the use of an index.

The 1940 US Federal Census was released online to the public on April 2, 2012.  Within the first three days, I had already found 40 families from my various tree branches.  I spent six months prior to the release researching the exact addresses and locations for these families so I could find them quickly upon the census release.

This 1940 US Federal Census entry features the family of Andrew S. Dreffs & Stella Marie (Kryska) Dreffs.  Andrew is my grand-uncle; he is the brother of my grandfather Walter Anthony Dreffs.  Andrew and Stella owned their home at 2424 Robinwood in Saginaw which they also resided in during 1935.  It was valued at $2,500.

Andrew Dreffs, 35, was born in Michigan.  He was employed as a punch press operator at a factory in the “clocks, watches, jewelry, or silverware” industry according to his industry code.  He had a 4th grade education while his wife Stella had an 8th grade education.  She was born in Pennsylvania and was a housewife.  Their son Edward Dreffs, age 15, was a student and had completed his 8th grade year.

Stella’s brother, Theodore Kryska, also lived in the household.  He was 26 years old, single and employed as chromium plater at a plating factory.  Theodore had completed his freshman year of high school and was born in Michigan.

Andrew Dreffs

Andrew Dreffs

Further down on the same page you will find Andrew’s niece Josephine (Grabowski) Sowulewski and her husband Joseph R Sowulewski. I’ll explore their entries in tomorrow’s post.

Source citation: 1940 US Federal Census, State of Michigan, Saginaw County, Saginaw, ED 73-47A, Sheet 11A, Lines 5-8.

Find out more about Andrew S. Dreffs in my Cole Green Family Tree on Ancestry.com.

Check out the memorial for Andrew S. Dreffs on FindAGrave.com.

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Veronica (Dreffs) Remyszewski (#25 of 40) – My First 40 Finds in the 1940 US Census
Jun 25th, 2012 by Jessica

Welcome to My First 40 Finds in the 1940 US Census!  This blog series is a tribute to the first 40 entries that I located without the use of an index.

The 1940 US Federal Census was released online to the public on April 2, 2012.  Within the first three days, I had already found 40 families from my various tree branches.  I spent six months prior to the release researching the exact addresses and locations for these families so I could find them quickly upon the census release.

This 1940 US Federal Census entry features the family of Stanley Remyszewski and Veronica “Vera” (Dreffs) Remyszewski.  Vera is my grand-aunt; she is the sister of my grandfather Walter Anthony Dreffs. The family was living at 2323 Lowell Street in Saginaw, Michigan which they also resided in during 1935.  They owned the home which was valued at $2,000.

Stanley Remyszewski, age 55, was born in Poland and was attending school.  He had filed his Declaration of Intent (code “Pa”) but was not yet a naturalized citizen.  He and his wife Vera only had a 1st grade education.  Stanley was a laborer in a graphite factory and had worked 42 weeks during 1939 for earnings of $1,020.  Vera was a housewife who was born in Michigan.  Their children were:

  • Pauline Remyszewski (23, laborer in a beet field, seeking work)
  • Joseph Remyszewski (20, laborer in a beet field, seeking work)
  • Tillie Remyszewski (18, unemployed)
  • Virginia Remyszewski (17, laborer in a beet field, seeking work)
  • Loretta Remyszewski (15)
  • Sylvester Remyszewski (13)
  • Richard Remyszewski (10)
  • Delores Remyszewski (8)
Stanley & Veronica (Dreffs) Remyszewski

Stanley & Veronica (Dreffs) Remyszewski

Source citation: 1940 US Federal Census, State of Michigan, Saginaw County, Saginaw, ED 73-47A, Sheet 9B Lines 77-80; continued on Sheet 10A Lines 1-6.

Find out more about Vera Dreffs in my Cole Green Family Tree on Ancestry.com.

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Six Tips for Salt Lake City: What We Learned About the Family History Library
Jun 24th, 2012 by Jessica

My friend Sarah and I just returned today from six full days of research at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.  We spent six months preparing for these six days, so we thought it would be most appropriate if we presented our top six tips for your next visit to the library.  There are many sites on the web that offer incredible tips for preparing and visiting the library.  These are things we learned upon our arrival and through trial and error.

When you’re done reading these tips, check out all of our photos from the Family History Library on Flickr.

We’ve also posted short videos showing the main areas for:

#1: Dry erase magnets are awesome.

Many sites recommend you to bring magnets to quickly refile microfilms.  We didn’t see  a single patron doing this except for us, and it was such a huge time saver!  We picked up these Quartet ReWritables Dry-Erase Magnet Boards prior to our trip and found them to be an amazing way to retrieve and refile microfilm in the stacks.  You can pick these up on Amazon.com or in stores at Wal-Mart.  Simply determine which film you need, and write the film number on the magnet.  Take it into the stacks and retrieve your film.  Place the magnet on the outside of the cabinet.  When you’re done with the film, easily locate the cabinet by finding your magnet.  Erase the film number, and start over again!  Cheap, effective and fast.

Dry Erase Magnets

Dry Erase Magnets

Use Dry Erase Magnets to quickly refile microfilms

Use Dry Erase Magnets to quickly refile microfilms

#2: Slashes come after numbers.

It took the help of a couple of volunteers at the library for us to figure this one out.  The FHL uses a modified Dewey Decimal system.  It follows the pattern of numbers coming after letters, for example: “977.4 A5b” comes before “977.4 4a” in the stacks.  What we also discovered is that slashes come after numbers.  For example: “974.522 H2b” comes before “977.522/A9c” in the stacks.  Pay attention to the slashes and make sure you are looking at the section following the last number.

We’d also like to note that books can be found in the stacks, in Overflow or in an area called High Density.  Overflow stacks are located at the end of the main stacks in an area called “Q.”  However, High Density books are not accessible to patrons and are not always noted in the catalog.  If you can’t find the book you need, ask at the Access Services window.  If it’s in High Density, you may need to visit another floor and ask them to retrieve it for you.  When this occurs, be prepared to hand over your government ID until you return the book to Access Services.

Big Stack of Books

Big Stack of Books

#3: Vault film requests are filed with everything else.

If you’ve requested vault films (and we hope you do ahead of time) note that they will be filed in with the rest of the microfilms.  You don’t need to ask for them at Access Services.  They simply show up.  If they aren’t filed in with the rest, they may not have had enough room for your film, so look in the microfilm Overflow section which will be in the last row among the cabinets labeled “Empty.”  Look for the Overflow tag attached to a cabinet in that last row.

#4: You don’t need a copy card to scan.  Scanning is free!

You can scan books or microfilms and it is completely free.

Scanning with Multifunction Machines

Scanning books can be done on any multifunction machine located on any floor.  Simply pick up the attached copy card (on a cord) and swipe it to begin.  Follow the instructions on the top of the machine to insert your flash drive and scan the document.  Note that books scanned in this fashion allow you to scan multiple pages at once, but all scans from your session are embedded into a single PDF file.  If you are scanning different books, you may wish to end your session and begin a new one after each book so that it creates multiple PDF files.  We found the multifunction scanners to be fast, but we had no idea if the results on the flash drive were what we were expecting.  There is no feedback to the user with this method.

Here’s an example of a document I scanned which the machine descriptively named 20120620202819789.pdf.  I had no way of knowing it was sideways or that it was cut off on one side until I looked at it on the computer.

Multifunction Machine - Scan, Copy or Print

Multifunction Machine - Scan, Copy or Print

Multifunction Machine - Copy card reader and USB drive port

Multifunction Machine - Copy card reader and USB drive port

Multifunction Machine - Instructions

Multifunction Machine - Instructions

Scanning with the Flatbed Scanner

You can add your name to the list at the Access Services window on the third floor for a 15-minute time slot on the flatbed scanner.  While it affords better feedback to the user and allows you to determine exactly what you are scanning and the file name you are saving it as, the scanner is painfully slow.  I found it much more effective to simply take photographs of the book title page and the pages I wanted to keep with my camera.  The readability is the same when using macro mode and a steady hand.

Scanning with the Microfilm Scanners

Most floors have microfilm scanners.  These machines are fast and easy to use, and volunteers are abundant and ready to assist you with the technology.  Simply insert your flash drive and click on the button that shows a scanner with a USB stick (duh!) and you can choose what to call your file and where you want to save it.  Make sure you are saving the file to your flash drive and not to the hard drive.  The application keeps the previous user’s settings so always watch out for that.  Also, I recommend saving in both .TIF and .JPG for the best results.  The .TIF file will allow you to change exposure and contrast later with no compression loss, while a .JPG copy will be fast for sharing and posting online.  It only takes a second to save it twice.  Bonus tip – Use a label maker to adhere your name and cell phone number onto each flash drive you use.  If you forget the flash drive in a computer somewhere, some nice soul might contact you to return it.

Note that you can’t use the microfilm scanners for long periods of time.  The library expects you to find the location on the microfilms using the old fashioned hand crank readers, and then transfer your film to the scanner to scan what you’d like.  Ask the volunteers for assistance if you need some help with the setup or the application.

Microfilm Scanner

Microfilm Scanner

Printing Documents

Printing is not free.  You need you purchase a copy card to print.  Regular 8.5×11 black and white prints cost $0.05 each. Bonus tip – when you print to the print server from any computer, it asks you to enter your initials and an identifier so you know which document you are printing.  One of the volunteers mentioned to me that it is advantageous to add extra spaces in front of your identifier because spaces show up at the top of the list.  For example, ”   My File” will show up before “My File” in the list of everyone’s print jobs.  It’s a sneaky way to make sure your prints show up at the top of the list when you print your files.

Copy Cards Vending Machine

Copy Cards Vending Machine

Copy Cards for Sale - $2 and up

Copy Cards for Sale - $2 and up

#5: There is no caffeine in the building.

Caffeine is a stimulator and an addictive substance, something that the Mormon culture does not support.  You will not find any caffeine in the break room.  No coffee; no Coke or Pepsi.  They do have non-caffeinated beverages such as milk, chocolate milk, juice, Caffeine Free Diet Coke, Sprite, Cactus Cooler and the like.  If you want a caffeine fix we recommend heading either to JB’s Restaurant for a break, or go to the gift shop or onto one of the floors in the Plaza Hotel next door where they have Coke products in the vending machines.

Vending Machines - Sodas

Vending Machines - Sodas

Vending Machines - Milk, Water and Juice

Vending Machines - Milk, Water and Juice

#6: Ask, and then ask again. And then ask again. And again, if you need to.

We cannot stress this last tip enough.  We read this on a few sites during our preparation for the trip, but I’m going to tell you my story so it sinks in for you!

I’ve got a brick wall on my mother’s side.  Her father’s father came to the USA around 1891 from “Germany.”  That’s all I know.

  1. I approached a volunteer and I asked her if she knew of any resources to search immigration or ship records from Germany which were not already online.  She pointed me to FamilySearch.org and said to use the computers to look up what I needed.  Not helpful.
  2. The second time I went to a different staff member, and asked him if he knew of any Naturalization records available that might help me with my brick wall.  He said usually the library doesn’t keep Naturalization records because the NARA sites want to charge for them.  (Not true – they have all of them on microfilm onsite for the county I needed.)  He showed me as he navigated on his computer to the place in the catalog for Naturalization records for Otsego County, Michigan.  Then he clicked on the film number and was presented with the screen to “order” the film to your local FHL center.  He proceeded to explain to me that this was how I could “order” the Naturalization record from the National Archives.  OMG.  We’re going backwards here.
  3. As a final last ditch attempt, on the International floor I approached a woman near the Maps area.  I asked her if she could point me to any maps of Poland while it was under German occupation.  As it turned out, she was a professional genealogist.  She proceeded to dig deeper and deeper into my story and worked with me for more than an HOUR one-on-one, giving me one lead after the next.  She poured over the documents that I had such as the Naturalization papers, obituaries and census records, and allowed me to take notes on more than a dozen ways I might be able to get the information I need.  The experience was incredible!  She was incredible.  I am so glad I asked her where to find a map of Poland.

The people at the Family History Library are a mix of staff, volunteers and professional genealogists.  There is no way of knowing who is whom by just looking at them.  You might approach one person and he is a volunteer missionary, and the woman sitting next to him might be a professional genealogist.  It pays to keep asking until you get the help you need.  Ask questions in different ways.  Ask different people.  Ask at different times or on different days.  You never know where it might lead you.

We hope these tips help you during your experience at the Family History Center.  Remember to take lots of breaks, and get out there to see the sights in Salt Lake City.  The area is beautiful and has plenty of fun to offer.

Happy Researching!

Jessica
www.jessicagreen.com

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Augustus Carlton Sheets (#24 of 40) – My First 40 Finds in the 1940 US Census
Jun 24th, 2012 by Jessica

Welcome to My First 40 Finds in the 1940 US Census!  This blog series is a tribute to the first 40 entries that I located without the use of an index.

The 1940 US Federal Census was released online to the public on April 2, 2012.  Within the first three days, I had already found 40 families from my various tree branches.  I spent six months prior to the release researching the exact addresses and locations for these families so I could find them quickly upon the census release.

This 1940 US Federal Census entry features the family of Augustus “Gus” Carlton Sheets, my 2nd great-grand uncle.  Augustus, age 60, was a Widow.  His wife Ellen Josephene (Lindwall) Sheets passed away in 1923.  He had an 8th grade education and owned his own business as a Barber.  He worked all 52 weeks of 1939 and earned a very respectable $2,000 in wages.  The family lived at 706 Morgan Street in Valparaiso.  Augustus owned the home which was valued at $3,000.

Four of Augustus’ children lived at home with him.  Daughter Berniece Sheets, the informant on this census, was 25 years old and a high school graduate.  She was single and working as a clerk in a retail store, working 52 weeks during 1939 and earning just $100 for her efforts. Daughter Gladys Sheets, age 23, was also single and a high school graduate.  She was not employed.

Sons Carroll and Melvin were also living in the home.  Carroll Sheets was 21 years old, single and a high school graduate.  He was employed as an inspector at Indiana Steel, and had worked 24 weeks during 1939 earning $800.  His younger brother Melvin Sheets, age 16, had completed his freshman year of high school.  He was not employed.

Augustus Carlton Sheets

Augustus Carlton Sheets

Source citation: 1940 US Federal Census, State of Indiana, Porter County, Center Township, ED 64-4, Sheet 6A, Lines 33-37.

Find out more about Augustus Carlton Sheets in my Cole Green Family Tree on Ancestry.com.

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Twitter Weekly Updates for 2012-06-24
Jun 24th, 2012 by Jessica

  • If you're under age 12 or over age 75, you can now keep your shoes and jacket on thru airport security. Cuz those people can't be a threat? #
  • On my way to Salt Lake City! http://t.co/O0VEWNs #
  • Oh man… that was a very, very turbulent flight. *blech* #
  • Dinner @ Lucky 13's in SLC. Breath Enhancer burger and a Grilled Cheese. Yum! http://t.co/G8pr1bA #
  • Downtown SLC from Antelope Island http://t.co/AC7MdeE #
  • Our view of SLC and the Family History Library (bottom) http://t.co/lRFMMEM #
  • Family History Library, here we come!!! #
  • Waiting to enter the Family History Library in SLC! http://t.co/NWcyxz2 #
  • Third floor US and Canada Books at the FHL http://t.co/hJ901mj #
  • I found a death record for Nahum Green in Royalston, MA. Died July 29, 1776 "of smallpox caught in camp at Cambridge" aged 47 years. #
  • I also found the birth record for Nahum Green, son of William and Sarah, born April 13, 1729 in Leicester, MA. That's another generation! #
  • Dinner @ The Pie Pizzeria Downtown SLC was incredible. Excellent cheese pull-a-part, a Wise Guy and a custom w/all my favorites. #delicious #
  • Red Butte Gardens at the University of Utah http://t.co/HMDckBW #
  • View of Temple Square from our hotel http://t.co/VxHmKOI #
  • Yankee Candle has a new line of "Man Candles." I can't make this stuff up. http://t.co/n97viUt #
  • TRAX going under the City Creek Skywalk http://t.co/XjL1eyc #
  • The Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has a piano outside that says "Play Me" all over it! http://t.co/6BLQwKm #
  • I found the missing link in the Green family history! Nahum – William – William – William – Thomas of Malden, MA born in 1606 in England. #
  • I found some land records for David Cole and Edward Payne Cole, along with the Will for Benjamin Cole this morning. Woot! Time for lunch. #
  • Tower of Books at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Arts (Wall of Language in the background) http://t.co/FUZqKeL #
  • We had a great break for lunch at City Creek and walked through UMoCA. Now it's back to research at the library! #
  • INCREDIBLE find: Nahum Green's full estate inventory from January 1, 1776! #
  • This morning we're off an adventure to Evanston, Wyoming and heading down the Mirror Lake Bypass. #
  • Checking out a Quilt shop in Evanston, Wyoming http://t.co/eGC3Ca4 #
  • Dinosaurs at the Wyoming Rocks & Fossils shop http://t.co/zbTmpmk #
  • Mini's Cupcakes in downtown SLC! http://t.co/DDGgbu6 #
  • We had a nice adventure to Wyoming and back. We decided to skip Mirror Bypass in favor of more library time. Back to the microfilm readers! #
  • We also drove through Park City and saw the Olympic Park site from the 2002 Winter Olympics. #
  • These are the records in Polish I'm searching through to find Joseph Dreffs' birthdate… #helpme http://t.co/96OZY2C #
  • I found the bond administration for Nahum Green proving that his wife Dorcus (Sanger) Green was still alive on January 1, 1776. #
  • Fried Macaroni & Cheese at The Cheesecake Factory http://t.co/G7LLj1c #
  • Fooooooood comaaaaaaaaaaa! #
  • I found the original birth record for Cirel Green & death record for his father Nahum Green! http://t.co/CpUi3xx #
  • This might just be a researcher's worst nightmare… http://t.co/9QPrhWf #
  • Lunch @ Guzzi's Vintage Burgers & Fries was… unique. Hole in the wall lunch dive with an interesting clientele. Sarah liked her burger! #
  • Pioneer Model at This Is The Place in SLC http://t.co/FLADDoM #
  • Utah State Capitol Building http://t.co/lT1NXK2 #
  • Lady Liberty looks out towards the West http://t.co/4yoExCt #
  • Dinner @ The Lion House Pantry, Bringham Young's home, was very good. Grilled ham, pot roast, sides and some apple pie! Yum! #
  • We're watching the Mormon Tabernacle Choir practice in Salt Lake City! http://t.co/NyqV5cr #
  • Breakfast @ The Lion House Pantry is unbelievable! Sourdough pancakes with house-made cinnamon butter syrup… YUM! #
  • Flowers at the Bee Hive House http://t.co/olOxopT #
  • Grand chandelier inside the Hotel Utah http://t.co/wrgz2Tm #
  • Inside Temple Square http://t.co/r6F9gqz #
  • I found the original marriage record for Nathaniel Sanger and Dorcas Peak from October 27, 1715 in Woodstock, CT! http://t.co/wUMKSqH #
  • I also found Dorcas Sanger's birth record on the same film from 1732! Dorcas married Nahum Green in 1750. She is Cirel Green's mother. #
  • We had a short walk through the Tracy Aviary. We saw Rare Birds and the Owl Forest before overheating. It's awfully hot outside today! #
  • I found the index entry for the estate settlement of Cyrel Green, died 1808 in Bethel, Vermont but I can't find the original record. :( #
  • I must say @stampsgal is AWESOME! She found Cyrel's estate docs! #
  • Parley is not listed as a minor on Cyrel's estate. That means either Cyrel wasn't his father after all, or his 1800 birth date is wrong… #
  • …and then @stampsgal in all her brilliance expressed the theory that the "Polly" in the guardianship probate is actually "Parley!" #
  • The angel Moroni is shining in the morning sun @ Temple Square http://t.co/b41rVOn #
  • Well, Parley Green and his siblings are nowhere in births, marriages, deaths or cemetery records for Barnard or Bethel, Vermont. #sigh #
  • I found Abner and his parents Parley and Maria in the 1855 NY State Census, Monroe Co, Wheatland, District 2. #
  • I still can't make the link between Parley and his true father. :( #
  • Schaar line jackpot! Friedrich's birth record (1851), his parents Johann & Anna's marriage (1837) and Anna Borusch's birth record (1815). #
  • My final evening at FHL was filled with many discoveries and a ton of leads to follow as I move forward with my research. #incredibletrip #

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Joseph Austin Fitzgerald (#23 of 40) – My First 40 Finds in the 1940 US Census
Jun 23rd, 2012 by Jessica

Welcome to My First 40 Finds in the 1940 US Census!  This blog series is a tribute to the first 40 entries that I located without the use of an index.

The 1940 US Federal Census was released online to the public on April 2, 2012.  Within the first three days, I had already found 40 families from my various tree branches.  I spent six months prior to the release researching the exact addresses and locations for these families so I could find them quickly upon the census release.

This 1940 US Federal Census entry features the family of Joseph “Dock” Austin Fitzgerald and Rutha Jane (Stanfield) Fitzgerald.  Joseph, a laborer assigned to public emergency work on a water project, was 62 years old.  He had worked 52 weeks in 1939 for a meager $600 salary.  His wife Rutha was 61 years old and a Housewife.  The couple both had an 8th grade education and were born in Kentucky.  They lived in the same town as they did in 1935, although a new home which they were renting for $25 per month.

Their youngest daughter Merle Fitzgerald (32) and her husband Donald W. Ainsworth (33) also lived in the home with Joseph and Rutha.  Donald was a truck driver at a steel mill.

Joseph "Dock" Austin Jarrell

Joseph "Dock" Austin Jarrell

Source citation: 1940 US Federal Census, State of Indiana, Porter County, Valparaiso, ED 64-3, Sheet 1B, Lines 78-80; continued on Sheet 2A, Lines

Find out more about Joseph “Dock” Austin Fitzgerald, aka Dock Jarrell, in my Cole Green Family Tree on Ancestry.com.

Check out the memorial for Joseph Fitzgerald on FindAGrave.com.

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Howard Glenn Cole (#22 of 40) – My First 40 Finds in the 1940 US Census
Jun 22nd, 2012 by Jessica

Welcome to My First 40 Finds in the 1940 US Census!  This blog series is a tribute to the first 40 entries that I located without the use of an index.

The 1940 US Federal Census was released online to the public on April 2, 2012.  Within the first three days, I had already found 40 families from my various tree branches.  I spent six months prior to the release researching the exact addresses and locations for these families so I could find them quickly upon the census release.

This 1940 US Federal Census entry features the family of Howard Glenn Cole, my great-grand uncle.  He is listed here with his wife Agnes Christina “Jensen” Cole.  They are living with Agnes’ parents.  Both Howard and Agnes are age 26, born in Indiana and both completed their sophomore year of high school.  They were living in the same town as they did in 1935, but both are living in a new home.  Howard is working as a Machinist Helper in a Steel Mill having worked 42 weeks for $1,000 in 1939, while Agnes was a Housewife.  Their son Eugene was 11 months of age.

Howard Glenn Cole

Howard Glenn Cole

Source citation: Source citation: 1940 US Federal Census, State of Indiana, Porter County, Valparaiso, ED 64-7, Sheet 2B, Lines 43-45.

Find out more about Howard Glenn Cole in my Cole Green Family Tree on Ancestry.com.

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Happy Birthday, Kathleen!
Jun 22nd, 2012 by Jessica

Kathleen is held by her father, Douglass

Kathleen is held by her father, Douglass

I’d like to wish my sister Kathleen a very HAPPY 40TH BIRTHDAY! 
Just a little reminder that you’ll always be older than me.  *tee hee hee*

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