SIDEBAR
»
S
I
D
E
B
A
R
«
Sunday’s Obituary – May (Richards) Fisher
Dec 11th, 2011 by Jessica

This is the obituary for my 2nd great-grandmother, May (Richards) Fisher.  It was published in the Vidette-Messenger, February 25, 1959 on page 6.

Obituary for Mrs. William Green Fisher

Obituary for Mrs. William Green Fisher

Mrs. W. G. Fisher

HEBRON – Mrs. May Fisher, 92, Kouts, died Tuesday night in Porter Memorial hospital where she had been a patient for five weeks.
Born Nov. 5, 1866, near Hebron, she was the daughter of Benjamin and Anna (Smith) Richards. She was married Nov. 1, 1898 to W. G. Fisher, who died July 11, 1918. A son, John, also preceded her in death.
She had been living with a daughter, Mrs. Jennie Fitzgerald, in Kouts.
Surviving are Mrs. Fitzgerald; three sons, Earl of Momence, Ill., Albert of Kouts, and Samuel of Hebron; 17 grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren and one step-grandchild.
Services will be held at 2 pm Friday in phillips Funeral home. The Rev. Robert Pinsky, Hebron Christian church, will officiate, and burial will be in Hebron cemetery.
Friends may call from 6:30pm Thursday until services.

Treasure Chest Thursday – Opalescent Rock Pendant
Dec 8th, 2011 by Jessica

In an effort to document my family treasures which cannot be scanned in, I am publishing this series of pictures as part of the Treasure Chest Thursday theme at Geneabloggers.  Someday in the future, I hope to shed some light on these treasures for my family who might inherit them.  What were they for?  Who did they come from? Why were they considered treasures?  Let’s find out.

Opalescent Rock Pendant

Opalescent Rock Pendant

I purchased this opalescent pendant made from a rock at the mall when I was in High School.  I was going through a rock loving phase and I liked how it shined in the light.  There’s nothing much more to this.  I wore it a few times but mostly I just liked to look at it.  Simple as that!

Sunday’s Obituary – William Green Fisher
Dec 4th, 2011 by Jessica

This is the obituary for my 2nd great-grandfather, William Green Fisher. Published July 12, 1918 on page 1 of the Evening Messenger in Hebron, Indiana.

Obituary for William Green Fisher

Obituary for William Green Fisher

William Fisher, 60 years old, is dead at his home west of Hebron. He leaves a wife and a family of young children. The funeral will be held in Hebron tomorrow.

Surname Saturday – Campbell
Dec 3rd, 2011 by Jessica

This week we take a look at the lineage of the Campbell surname as it pertains to my husband’s family history.

Earliest Known Ancestor

Henry Campbell was my husband’s 3rd great grandfather.  I believe he was born circa 1821 in Rutland, Rutland County, Vermont although I cannot find his birth record to be sure.  According to the Michigan Marriages to 1850 index, Henry Campbell married Ruth Newcombe in Paw Paw, Van Buren County, Michigan on April 18, 1839.  The two had 10 children:

  1. Willard Newcomb Campbell 1843
  2. Walter Henry Campbell 1845 – 1917
  3. Clarissa Lenora Campbell 1847 – 1912
  4. Isaac Newton Campbell 1849 – 1850
  5. Charles Odell Campbell 1854 – 1906
  6. John Fremont Campbell 1856
  7. Julius Orian Campbell 1858 – 1922
  8. Jessie Theressa Campbell 1861
  9. Betsey Marion Campbell 1866
  10. Lenora B Campbell 1876

Henry Campbell died on 26 Jan 1873 in Waverly, Cheboygan, Michigan.

Campbell Family Lineage

Campbell Family Lineage

Lineage

Andrew Arthur Green > Jerald Max Green > Max Earl Green (1919 – 2001) > Wava Cecil Campbell (1888 – 1957) > Walter Henry Campbell (1845 – 1917) > Henry Campbell (1821 – 1873)

Items of Interest

Henry’s son Walter Henry Campbell is my husband’s 2nd great-grandfather.  Walter served in the Civil War as a Private in the Union Army, Company G, 13th Michigan Infantry.

According to the book “Record of service of Michigan volunteers in the civil war, 1861-1865” Volume 13, Page 29:

Campbell, Walter H., Waverly.  Enlisted in company G, Thirteenth Infantry, Aug. 29, 1864, at Kalamazoo, for 1 year, age 19.  Mustered Sept. 1, 1864.  Discharged at New York City May 26, 1865.

Campbell, Willard N., or William, Waverly.  Enlisted in company G, Thirteenth Infantry, Aug. 29, 1864, at Kalamazoo, for 1 year, age 21.  Mustered Sept. 1, 1864.  Sick at Goldsboro, N. C. April 8, 1865.  No further record.

Family Notes

I would like to find more information on the following:

  • Search for Walter Henry Campbell’s Civil War Pension files.
  • Find additional sources for Henry’s birth year (1821 vs. 1803 or 1800).
  • Find the parents and siblings of Henry Campbell and Ruth Newcombe.

Additional Information

Check out my Ancestry Family Tree for Henry Campbell and his wife Ruth Newcombe.

See the Find A Grave Memorial for Walter Henry Campbell.

Read about the Michigan Volunteers in the Civil War.

Treasure Chest Thursday – Helen Karpuk’s Eyeglasses
Dec 1st, 2011 by Jessica

In an effort to document my family treasures which cannot be scanned in, I am publishing this series of pictures as part of the Treasure Chest Thursday theme at Geneabloggers.  Someday in the future, I hope to shed some light on these treasures for my family who might inherit them.  What were they for?  Who did they come from? Why were they considered treasures?  Let’s find out.

Helen Karpuk's Glasses

Helen Karpuk's Glasses

This week’s treasure is courtesy of my Aunt Helen Geneviere (Karpuk) Thompson.  These were her childhood eyeglasses from the mid-1930s.  They were given to my mother Diane when her sister Helen passed away in 1994 while the family was cleaning out her house.

The gold colored metal plate which is glued inside the velvet liner reads:

G. E. TIEDKE M.D.
EYE.EAR.NOSE.THROAT
312 GRAEBNER BLDG.
SAGINAW W.S. MICH.

The pink cloth is also original to this case, and is stamped with the same doctor’s practice information.

Wednesday’s Child – The Stroik Girls
Nov 30th, 2011 by Jessica

Fair warning, I suggest you have tissues handy!  This tragic story truly breaks my heart.  I share this story to honor the memory of these three girls.  There’s no telling where their precious futures were to lead them.

Fourty-five years ago this week, the three young daughters of Melvin and Frances Stroik were killed in a house fire on November 29, 1966 in Saginaw, Michigan. Also killed in this tragedy was their courageous neighbor, Herman A. Wegner, while he was attempting to call for help.

My second cousins, sisters Dawn Marie Stroik (1962 – 1966), Tammy Sue Stroik (1963 – 1966) and Michelle Rene Stroik (1966 – 1966) were killed together in their front bedroom, the victims of a little girl’s curiosity for matches.  They are buried together in Roselawn Memorial Gardens in Saginaw, Michigan.

Mom Helpless As 3 Children Die In Flames

Mom Helpless As 3 Children Die In Flames

Mom Helpless As 3 Children Die In Flames

By VERN D. FOSS

News Staff Writer

A flash fire Thursday night filled three young sisters at the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Stroik, 6660 Dutch Road, as a 79-year old neighbor died of a heart attack running for help.

Killed by the fire were Dawn Marie Stroik, 4; Tammy Sue Stroik, 3; and Michelle R. Stroik, 9 months.  The neighbor, Herman A. Wegner, 6535 Dutch, died of a heart attack as he ran to the house from the Stroik home to turn in an alarm.  The THomas Township Fire Department used a resucitator, with the aid of James Township firemen, in a futile attempt to save his life.

Funeral Card for the Stroik Girls

Funeral Card for the Stroik Girls

The three sisters were dead on arrival at St. Luke’s Hospital.  Enroute, sheriff’s Deputy James Forrest made an unsuccessful attempt to revive Dawne [sic] Marie using mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.  Coronor William F. Shea said the cause of death for all three children was suffocation.  The Stroiks have no other children.

Mrs. Stroik told the Sheriff’s Department she was outside, shoveling snow off the driveway about 50 feet from the house when she noticed flames in a back bedroom of the northeast corner of the house.  Wegner ran to the house when he heart her screams as she tried to get into the house.  She was driven back by the flames and was later treated and released at St. Luke’s for minor burns to her face and hands.  Stroik was on his way home from work when the tragedy occurred.

James firemen received the alarm at 7:18 p.m. and called for aid from Thomas firemen.  An investigation after the fire last night and again this morning by James Fire Chiel Jack E. Ferchae, Thomas Fire Chief Kenneth W. Gauze and Sheriff Robert E. Loubert indicated children playing with matches caused the blaze.

A quantity of unused kitchen matches was found on the carpeted floor of the parents’ bedroom in the front, or southeast corner of the house, where the children were found.  Also in the baby’s crib underneath the blankets were two burned matches.

Mrs. Stroik told Loubert that before she went outside she checked and found all three children asleep, the two oldest in the back bedroom and the youngest in the front bedroom.  Ferchae and Gauze agreed that the fire definitely started in the back bedroom, which was burned out.  A honeycombed hot spot and hole in the floor were found there.  The blaze spread throughout the house, burning the walls and ceilings.

Mrs. Stroik told sheriff’s deputies the only box of kitchen matches in the house was kept in a kitchen cupboard.  Apparently one of the older children started the fire in the back bedroom, became frightened and both ran to the front bedroom with the baby, officials surmise.

The bodies of the Stroik children are at the Shea funeral home and the body of Wegner is at the Case Funeral Chapel.

Obituary for Dawn Marie, Manny Sue and Michelle Rene Stroik

Obituary for Dawn Marie, Manny Sue and Michelle Rene Stroik

Stroik, Dawn Marie,
Stroik, Tammy Sue,
Stroik, Michelle.
6660 Dutch Road.
Passed away Tuesday evening at St. Luke’s Hospital from injuries received in a fire at their home.  Dawn Marie was born Sept. 17, 1962, Tammy Sue, Oct. 28, 1963, and Michelle, Feb. 15, 1966.  Surviving are their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Stroik, their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Stroik; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Talik; great-grandparents, Mrs. Angeline Wolak, Mrs. Helen Stroik, Mr. and Mrs. Otto Wegner, all of Saginaw.  Funeral service will take place 1 p.m. Friday at the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints., 300 N. Center Road, one-half block north of Gratiot Ave.  Elder Lynn L. Hensley will officiate assisted by Elder Ezra Bennett, with burial in Roselawn Memorial Gardens.  Friends may call at the Shea Funeral Home from 2 p.m. until 9 p.m. Thursday and from 11 a.m. Friday at the church until time of service.

The article and the obituary were both published in The Saginaw News in Saginaw, Michigan on Wednesday, November 30, 1966.

Gravesite for the Stroik Girls

Gravesite for the Stroik Girls

Merry Christmas from Tammy and Dawn Stroik (1964)

Merry Christmas from Tammy and Dawn Stroik (1964)

Sunday’s Obituary – Donald G. Green
Nov 27th, 2011 by Jessica

This is the obituary for my husband’s grandfather Max Green’s brother, Donald G. Green. It was published in Kalamazoo Gazette on 8/5/2009.

Obituary for Donald Green

GREEN, Donald G.
Age 81
Gobles

Went to be with his Lord Sunday, Aug. 2, 2009, at his daughter’s home. Mr. Green was born Jan. 1, 1928, in Kendall and resided in this area all of his life where he was a member of Merson Church. He enjoyed flying and retired from Upjohn in 1990. He is survived by his wife, the former Janet Leedy, whom he married June 11, 1948; four children, Jim (Rose) Green of Parchment, Nancy (Rich) Maxwell of Paw Paw, Carol Miller of Gobles, Randy (Debbie) Green of Gobles; seven grandchildren; three great grandchildren; one brother, Robert (Ruth) Green of Otsego; one sister, Betty Leversee of Kendall. Preceded in death by two brothers, Ernest and Max, three sisters Virginia, Helen and Wilma The family will meet friends Thur. 2-4 and 6-8 PM at the GOBLES CHAPEL.

D. L. Miller Funeral Home www.dlmillerfuneralhome.com

Funeral services will be held Friday, 11 AM at Merson Church, Pastor Gail Pike officiating. Interment Robinson Cemetery.

Obituary for Donald Green
Surname Saturday – Root
Nov 26th, 2011 by Jessica

This week we take a look at the lineage of the Root surname as it pertains to my husband’s family history.  Other than locating a few Census records and typing up a sketch passed down through the family, I have not researched this line in detail.

Earliest Known Ancestor

My husband’s 3rd great-grandfather was Frederick Franklin Root, born in either 1800 or 1803 in Greenville, Greene County, New York (depending on the source you believe).  His parents were Asa Root and Lorena Judson.  A full detail of his life and family can be found in the sketch below.

 

Root Family Lineage

Root Family Lineage

Lineage

Andrew Arthur Green > Jerald Max Green > Max Earl Green (1919 – 2001) > Fred Ozro Green (1882 – 1961) > Marion Dearborn Root (1861 – 1941) > Frederick Franklin Root (1800 – 1886)

Items of Interest

The following sketch was authored by the children of Frederick and Rachel Root in the early 1900’s.

Sketch of the life of Frederick F. Root

It seems meet for us that we should write a chronicle, and preserve for posterity an individual history of our ancestors.

Frederick Franklin Root was the son of Asa Root and Lorena (Judson) Root, and began life in Greenville, N.Y. of the 10th of Sept. 1800, thus passing his life in an epoch of wonderful industrial advancement. He spent the First 15 years of his life in Green Co. N.Y. and after the death of his parents, he with the rest of his family moved to Tioga Co. N.Y., which was then wild and mountainous, living with an older sister, Mrs. Obedience Pierce and her husband Franklin Pierce.

At the age of 16 years he met with a serious accident while engaged in making maple sugar he fell into the fire, having fainted from overwork, loss of sleep and exhaustion, and was so seriously burned that his right arm was amputated below the elbow. Full of courage, he took up the duties of life with a strong heart although seriously handicapped he managed to accomplish as much with one hand as most men do with two, and there was no kind of work too difficult for him to attempt. He was noted for his wonderful fetes of strength and activity.

The time passed by this family, living in the nineteenth century, constitutes a link between the old pioneer days and the later era of opulent prosperity and manifold advantages.

We of today can scarcely conceive of the conditions of things one hundred years ago when Frederick Root was a young man- no railroads, no telegraphs, no telephones, wireless systems, mowers, binders or other farm machinery found on the farms in the first part of the twentieth century.

We (his children) recall the stories related by him about the hand sickle for harvesting wheat, the scythe for mowing hay, and the many primitive implements in use in his day, and we can but wonder how they would serve our needs in this twentieth century.

After living in southern New York for some time he again moved, taking up his residence at Lawrence, Tioga Co. Pennsylvania. Somehow this was the finest town he had ever struck-the soil was so rich, the birds so beautiful and the trees so fine and stately. Was it all these? Or was it! Alas? There was a maiden in Lawrence (and she was called the handsomest girl in the Susquehana River) that captured his affections. Her name was Rachel Malvina Stewart.

They soon agreed to share the burdens of life and on the 9th of Oct. 1842 they were married. They lived in Lawrence seven years, then in 1849 thinking it was better farther on, he took his family northward to the Erie canal and going by boat to Detroit and Kalamazoo which was at that time the western end of the Michigan Central Railroad.

He located on a farm 8 miles northwest of Kalamazoo in the township of Oshtemo. He was a sure shot and a successful hunter and took a keep delight in his ability to surpass the younger man in marksmanship even after old age and failing vision had overtaken him. The writer recalls when a mere child seeing him drive a nail that was marked with chalk on the head to make it visible at a distance of ten rods. He was then 75 years old.

After the death of his wife in 1879 he sold his farm and spent his remaining years with his daughter, Mrs. Abner Oakes Green and died at the ripe old age of eighty-six at Kendall, Van Buren Co. Mich. March 30th, 1886.

Frederick F. Root, son of Asa Root & Lorena Judson
Rachel M. Stewart, daughter of John Stewart & Nancy Rathbone born in Sulivan, Tioga Co. Pa. Sept. 7th, 1824
Frederick F. Root and Rachel M. Stewart were married at Lawrence, Tioga Co. Pa. Oct 9th, 1842.

Obituary for Marion Dearborn (Root, Green) Forbes

Obituary for Marion Dearborn (Root, Green) Forbes

The family of Frederick F. and Rachel M. Root

Frederick Franklin Root was born in Greenville, New York on September 10, 1800
Rachel M. Stewart was born in Sulivan, Tioga Co, Pennsylvania on September 7, 1824
They were married in Lawrence, Tioga Co, Pennsylvania on October 9, 1842

Children of Frederick and Rachel Root

  1. Asa Theodore Root was born in Lawrence, Tioga Co. Pa. Nov. 12, 1843
  2. Sarah Lorena Root was born in Lawrence, Tioga Co. Pa. Sept. 1, 1845
  3. Nancy Amelia Root was born in Lawrence, Tioga Co. Pa. Sept. 30, 1848
  4. Helen America Root was born in Oshtemo, Kalamazoo Co. Mich. Feb. 10, 1851
  5. Maria L. J. Root was born in Oshtemo, Kalamazoo Co. Mich. Aug. 12, 1853
  6. John F. Root was born in Alamo, Kalamazoo Co. Mich. Oct. 4, 1856
  7. Marion Dearborn Root was born in Oshtemo, Kalamazoo Co. Mich. Jan 23, 1861
  8. Emma Allucia Root was born in Oshtemo, Kalamazoo Co. Mich. June 6, 1868

Deaths

  • Asa Root died in Lawrence, Tioga Co. Pa. Jan 7, 1846
  • Nancy A. Root died in Oshtemo, Kalamazoo Co. Mich. April 24, 1853
  • Maria L.J. Root died in Oshtemo, Kalamazoo Co. Mich. 1865
  • Rachel M. Root died in Oshtemo, Kalamazoo Co. Mich. Dec. 13, 1879
  • Sarah L. Brackett died in Pierson, Montcalm Co. Mich. Dec 24, 1880
  • Helen A. Pichett died in Hutchinson, Kansas March 2, 1916
  • Emma A. Green died in Kalamazoo, Mich. May 11, 1941
  • Marion D. Forbes died in Kalamazoo, Mich. Aug. 6, 1941
  • John Frederick Root died in Caro, Mich. Jan. 14, 1947

Family Notes

I would like to find the following information over the course of my future research:

  • Obituary for Frederick Root, d 1886 Van Buren Co, Michigan
  • Obituary for Rachel Root, d 1879 Van Buren Co, Michigan
  • Census record for Frederick in 1840, 1830, 1820
  • Census record for Frederick in 1850 (I don’t think it’s “Oliver’s” family)
  • Census record for Asa Root in 1810, 1800
  • Death date for Asa Root, died before 1815 according to Sketch above

Additional Information

Check out my Ancestry Family Tree for Frederick Franklin Root.

See the Find A Grave Memorial for Marion Dearborn (Root Forbes) Green.

Surname Saturday – Green
Nov 19th, 2011 by Jessica

This week we take a look at the lineage of the Green surname as it pertains to my husband’s family history.  The Green name belongs to that of my husband, which I proudly accepted upon our marriage in 2002.  I have been researching his family line along with my own for the past decade. It has been a very strong focus of my research.

The Green family lineage is controversial amongst the many genealogists currently researching it.  I offer the following information as a loose translation to a puzzle that is still being actively researched and debated.

Earliest Known Ancestor

Nahum Green, my husband’s 5th great grandfather, was born 10 Apr 1729 in Leicester, Worcester, Massachusetts.  His wife was Dorcus Sanger, born 01 May 1732 in Woodstock, Windham, Connecticut. The couple had eight children: Pamela Green, Zariah Green, Zevirah Green, Jeraiah Green, Amasa Green, Jared Green, Nahum Green and my husband’s 4th great-grandfather Cyril Green.  Nahum died on 29 Jul 1775 in Royalston, Worcester, Massachusetts.  His wife Dorcus died in 1773 in Royalston, Worcester, Massachusetts.

Green Family Lineage

Green Family Lineage

Lineage

Andrew Arthur Green > Jerald Max Green > Max Earl Green (1919 – 2001) > Fred Ozro Green (1882 – 1961) > Abner Oakes Green (1832 – 1907) > Parley Green (1800 – 1855) > Cyril Green (1773 – 1808) > Nahum Green (1729 – 1775)

Items of Interest

A majority of my research on the Green family lineage has focused on my husband’s third great-grandfather, Abner Oakes Green.  Abner was born 08 Feb 1832 in Mumford, Monroe County, New York.  He served as a Union soldier in the Civil War, and I am incredibly proud of his service to our country.

Abner Oakes Green was born in Mumford, Monroe Co. N.Y. and was one of a family of eight children. 

The following information was from records of Frances Green Fenner.  “Abner Oakes Green was the son of Parley Green(e) and Maria Oaks or Oakes.  He was French Yankee.  His brothers and sisters were: Matilda Green, Rufus Green, Ruben Green, Jane Green, Sarah Green, Submit Green and Hiram Green.”

Abner’s father was Parley Green, who was born in 1800 in Shaftsbury, Bennington Co, Vermont or Washington Co, New York.  The two county lines were blurred during this time, and no true record exists for his birth.  Parley died in 1855 in Monroe County, New York. Abner’s mother was Maria Oakes, whose maiden name he was given as his middle name.  Maria was born 09 Jun 1802 in Bradford, Orange, Vermont.  I’m not sure when and where she died.

Had many disadvantages as a child, receiving only a common school education. When young he served a three year apprenticement, learning the wagon makers trade and also worked in a machine shop. He helped to build one of the first wheat separators put out by Mr. David Nichols (later of the firm of Nichols and Shepherd).

Abner Oakes Green, private, Co. C 4th New York Heavy Artillery, Union Soldier, Civil War

Abner Oakes Green, private, Co. C 4th New York Heavy Artillery, Union Soldier, Civil War

When Uncle Sam called for volunteers he was one of the first in his town to offer his services and enlisted as a private in Co. C fourth N.Y. Heavy Artillery in September 1861 and served till the close of the war. He was married to Augusta Smith 26 December 1866 and to this union was born three children: Julia Green (1867 – ?), Milton A. Green (1869 – 1936) and Charles R. Green (1871-1888). Augusta was born in 1838 in New York and died June 22, 1876.

After his first wife Augusta died, Abner married Marion Dearborn Root in Paw Paw, Van Buren, Michigan on 07 November 1880.  Marion Dearborn Root was born 28 Jan 1861 in Oshtemo, Kalamazoo, Michigan.  To this union was born six more children: my husband’s 3rd great-grandfather Fred Ozro Green (1882 – 1961), Stephen Zit Green (1885 – 1970), Joe Green (1887 – 1887), Rachel Nell Green (1888 – 1973), Frances May Green (1891 – 1958), John Louis Green (1893 – 1972).

Death separated the two when Abner Oakes Green passed away on 31 May 1907 in Kendall, Pine Grove Township, Van Buren County, Michigan.  He is buried in the Kendall Cemetery with a military headstone indicating his service in the Civil War.

Marion later remarried to John Caleb Forbes on 23 December 1913.  Marion Forbes died on 06 Aug 1941 in Kalamazoo, Michigan.  She is also buried in Kendall Cemetery, Pine Grove Township, Section A, Row 3, Lot 12.

Family Notes

  • I have a few hundred pages of pension and medical documents from Abner’s service in the Civil War.  Some day I would like to digitize them and post them for others to see.
  • I would like to research the family of Nahum and Dorcus more thoroughly.
  • I need to find out when and where Maria Oakes Green died.

Additional Information

Check out my Ancestry Family Tree for Abner Oakes Green.

I manage a public Google Doc on the Green Family Parentage.  There are dozens of source references and debated facts listed, along with the thought process behind the current research.

See the Find A Grave Memorial for Abner Oakes Green, and link to graves of his family members.

Treasure Chest Thursday – Cross Stitch Magnet
Nov 17th, 2011 by Jessica

In an effort to document my family treasures which cannot be scanned in, I am publishing this series of pictures as part of the Treasure Chest Thursday theme at Geneabloggers.  Someday in the future, I hope to shed some light on these treasures for my family who might inherit them.  What were they for?  Who did they come from? Why were they considered treasures?  Let’s find out.

Jessica Cross Stitch Magnet

Jessica Cross Stitch Magnet

This family treasure is a little cross stitch with my name on it in red thread.  My mother made this piece as part of a massive collection of cross stitch magnets and items she created and sold at our schools for extra income.  She created the cross stitch names and cut them out.  She then glued each name on a piece of cardboard cut to size, and glued a magnet on the back.  Then she finished off the piece by gluing pre-made lace around the name.  This magnet is about 2 1/2 inches wide.

My mother made hundreds of these magnets and put them up for sale in the craft fairs.  I remember standing at the school during the sale, looking at her display of names in all different colors and laces.  I can’t recall how much she was selling them for, but it couldn’t have been more than $1 for each one.  It was probably less than that.

I treasure this magnet.  It is rapidly falling apart due to age.  The lace is yellowing and falling off the piece.  The only thing that is not coming apart is the thread in the name, and the magnet is thankfully still securely attached on the back.

»  Substance:WordPress   »  Style:Ahren Ahimsa
© 2013 Jessica M. Green